Travertine

 

 

 

 

Travertine is a natural stone such as Marble, Granite, Onyx, Limestone, Slate etc. The key difference between Travertine and other natural stones lies in the formation of the rock, the hardness of the stone and the appearance. Travertine is formed in hot springs and/or limestone caves. Travertine is not the same as Marble or Limestone which falls in the metamorphic rock category. Key characteristics of Travertine stone are the holes within the stone which are caused by carbon dioxide evasion.

History teaches us that there are no limits when it comes to the usage of Travertine stone. Even before Christ, Travertine used to be among the top building stones in Ancient Greek and Rome. Romans took advantage of Travertine for various constructions projects such as buildings and temples, aqueducts, baths, stairs, steps, and amphitheaters such as the Colosseum, the largest building in the world constructed mostly of travertine. Travertine was also used for sculptures and monuments. Even today in the 21st century, Travertine stone is being used for a huge variety of indoor and outdoor projects. There are no exact design guidelines when it comes to travertine. It can be used practically anywhere to enhance any area. The most popular uses in the UK include but are not limited to the following.

Most common indoor travertine usage in the UK:

  • Floors and Walls
  • Stairs & Steps
  • Bathroom & Showers
  • Countertops & Backsplashes
  • Travertine Sinks & Vessels
  • Medallions
  • Fireplaces

 

How often does Travertine need to be sealed?

There are no strict guidelines in regards to the sealing of Travertine. It’s a personal preference and depends on various aspects. If you are sealing a high traffic area such as a busy floor which is used on a daily basis, the sealer may not last as long opposed to sealed travertine wall tiles. You can get away with sealing travertine once every couple years while some areas may require more frequent sealing especially as the holes found in Travertine are likely to harbour bacteria. Some people don’t to seal at all although. My rule of the thumb is as follows. If you splash water on the tile or paver and the stone color becomes significantly more vibrant, it’s probably time for a round of sealing.